Poacher’s Cabin

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A small, off-grid holiday cabin in Dordogne, France. More info. here.

2016-07-07T11:59:44+00:00

16 Comments

  1. jeanette lowe September 6, 2014 at 12:57 am - Reply

    is there any way i can get the floor plans on this .., please call 832 692-0681

  2. Ray September 6, 2014 at 2:37 am - Reply

    Are plans available for the cottage? It is so beautiful! Is there a bathroom?

  3. tiny September 6, 2014 at 4:10 am - Reply

    I could live here the rest of my days…

  4. […] Poacher’s Cabin […]

  5. Meg September 7, 2014 at 1:01 am - Reply

    WOW! So creative and beautiful- that’s a true labor of love.

  6. Katie September 7, 2014 at 1:06 pm - Reply

    Beautiful construction but what I truly horrible name. In no sense of the word can “poacher” ever be construed in a positive light.

    • Sharon September 8, 2014 at 3:56 pm - Reply

      I just made and ate a poached and egg. It was yummy. Does that make me a poacher?

      I do get what you are saying. I was taken aback by the name as well. Possibly it has some historical meaning to the area?

  7. Dorothy September 8, 2014 at 1:19 pm - Reply

    Lovely cabin! Hate the name! I do love those real stairs up to a real bedroom. Follow the link for a view of the bathroom. It doesn’t show a shower, but I assume there is one.

  8. Robin + Rose Design September 8, 2014 at 3:23 pm - Reply

    What a beautiful little cabin! I’d love to stay here. The colors and feel of the exterior are similar to what I’m going for with my cottage home. A bit of an unfortunate choice for a name though…

  9. Robin September 8, 2014 at 6:07 pm - Reply

    I can count on one hand, the amount of tiny homes featured in Swoon and Alex’s site that so captivate and enchant me, that nothing needs be changed. THIS home, is one of them. From the glass of Woodland Phlox on the table to the hand-hewn stairs and railings to the comfy and gorgeous Granny Square throw, this place is a wonderland of beauty and well-thought out purpose.

    However….I agree with so many others…unless the word POACHER has a completely different meaning than it does in America, I’d absolutely DITCH THE NAME!!!! It would be like one of us Yanks calling a Tiny Home “Crack House”, “Ho’ Sweet Ho’,” or “Thug’s Paradise”. LOL (catch my drift?)

    For those of you interested, I grabbed these stats from their website:

    Rents for 82 pounds per night for two adults.

    Cooking
    Gas cooker
    Wood-fired stove
    Barbecue
    Gas fridge
    Bowl and washing up things all provided
    A bottle of wine, some cold beers, and a selection of kitchen basics (salt, pepper, spices, cooking oil, tea, coffee, sugar etc) are provided to get you started.

    Washing
    The compost loo and solar-powered shower (boosted by the woodburner) are built into the cabin.

    Heating, lighting & bedding
    Bedlinen & towels all provided
    Woodburner
    Solar-powered electric lights, candles and oil lamps
    12V power supply where you can charge mobile phones if you bring an in-car charger.

    Entertainment
    Packs of cards and board games
    Fishing rods
    Books including French-English dictionary, walking books and maps
    Small watercolour painting kit
    Wildlife field guides
    Binoculars
    Raft on the lake
    Mountain bikes

  10. Andrew Moss September 9, 2014 at 4:20 am - Reply

    It seems that ‘Poacher’ must have a different meaning in the USA. Here in England a Poacher still means a thief, which is a bad thing but a thief who is poor and working class that steals game from a wealthy land owner. Poacher have a strong and often romantic place in English literature and historic ties with the countryside.

  11. Katie G. September 13, 2014 at 5:17 am - Reply

    I love the house and I love the name, but then I am English! It suggests cheeky secretiveness, of hiding in the woods and getting 1 up on the rich gentry in the big house. Like Robin Hood hiding in Sherwood Forest.

    Poaching of course was a necessity for poor, rural people, in times gone by, if they wanted to eat any meat, to enrich their meagre diets. It carried serious penalties, but has been romanised into a practice of cat and mouse games, for the poor hero versa the greedy rich villain.

  12. Jackie September 16, 2014 at 11:55 pm - Reply

    Thanks, Andrew Moss. I was wondering about that. That term was also used in Cranford (BBC TV drama).

  13. Bob Kirkwood November 5, 2014 at 1:45 pm - Reply

    Hi everyone,
    As the builder of Poacher’s cabin I found your comments both entertaining & flattering, thank you.
    If anything, I’m more proud of the hot-water system than anything else, but that doesn’t show up in the pics! As far as the name goes, it’s connotations are more as Robin & Andrew point out, although a poacher is a thief, he’s only thieving from the rich landowner! If you’d like any further info, you can contact me at bobcabin@wanadoo.fr

  14. jenna November 6, 2014 at 8:25 am - Reply

    The stairs (love them) are they custom made by you or were they made to look like that

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