Tiny Presidential House

This small house, circa 1795, once was part of the complex of structures at Casso’s Inn, historically a well-frequented establishment in Raleigh, North Carolina. Here Andrew Johnson was born in 1808. His mother was a weaver and his father a hostler (stableman) at the inn. This unassuming wood, 2-story former inn kitchen measures 19’3” x 14’3” and is 24’9” in height. The gambrel roof is shingled; small dormer windows are at front and back, and on the side with no chimney is a tiny 4-pane window. Wooden steps lead to the entrance. The structure has a large double-shoulder chimney.

Photos credits David Hoffman.

8 comments

  • do you have more info on this house? price rooms etc,and interior pictures? ty

  • jean says:

    please find some interio pics don’t leave us hanging, wishin—

  • Mary says:

    Whats really sad is people with those professions nowadays couldn’t even afford to live in a home like that.

    • Dan says:

      But people have more choices as to what they want to do with their lives now. Don’t want to live in a small house (with a fat chimney)? Make better career choices. 😉

  • signalfire says:

    Great chimney! I too would love to see the inside, especially the hearth. What is it about a great brick or stone chimney that just makes the whole place look inviting?

    If there’s a window up high, there must be stairs in there somehow??

    Anyone know how long he ended up walking lost inside the White House? 🙂

  • emmy tea says:

    Career choice? Study hard, get your masters, find a job??? Do you really think it is that easy? There are many people who tried to make a good choice who ended up working at CVS or burger king. Tell me, what was your career choice?

  • texasdoxiemama says:

    In the day of this country’s forefathers and pioneers, tiny houses were the norm. As we became a richer nation with the room to expand, our homes got larger to match. Americans are only just starting to realize that we don’t have to go large and expensive to live the dream.

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