tiny-house

Bunk Box

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The Bunk Box Tiny House from Shelter Wise is a unique tiny house that leaves the wall framing and electrical exposed on the interior. This stylish detail has a great benefit to the homeowner: rather than covering the framing with drywall or wood paneling, they can use – and feel – an extra seven inches of width stretch out all the way to the exterior sheathing. Space is precious in a tiny home, so why let conventional construction methods hide what you could be using?

Built on a 16 foot trailer, the Bunk Box is 125 square feet on the main floor, with an additional 72 square feet in the sleeping loft. Tall people rejoice! A flat roof and exposed roof framing mean extra head height in the loft. Two large skylights, six windows, and even a second, optional door open the house to sunlight, great views and fresh air.

Learn more about the design at PAD Tiny Houses.

A 16′, 125 square feet tiny house on wheels in Portland, Oregon. More info. here.

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13 Comments

  • Reply Amy October 28, 2016 at 9:31 am

    “This stylish detail has a great benefit to the homeowner: rather than covering the framing with drywall or wood paneling, they can use – and feel – an extra seven inches of width stretch out all the way to the exterior sheathing. Space is precious in a tiny home, so why let conventional construction methods hide what you could be using?”

    Because I’d like to not freeze my ass off? 😉

    • Reply Kevin November 19, 2016 at 3:08 pm

      Amy what you are missing is that the design has 4″ thickness of foam on the outside of the framing and plywood shell, but yet concealed by the siding!

  • Reply Meeple Seerup October 28, 2016 at 1:01 pm

    I am the feerst commeent.

  • Reply Jason October 28, 2016 at 11:40 pm

    > so why let conventional construction methods hide what you could be using

    Um… Insulation?

  • Reply Sean Khang October 29, 2016 at 11:06 pm

    Hmm.. not a fan of unfinished looks…

  • Reply bklynebeth October 31, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    I am giggling hysterically…such a tiny house, such limited storage AND a dishwasher? Where would one store enough dishes to fill a dishwasher? I could see maybe a built-in washer/dryer all-in-one unit, but a dishwasher?

    • Reply Amy November 1, 2016 at 2:29 am

      I think that might be a mini fridge with freezer?

    • Reply Amy November 1, 2016 at 2:29 am

      I think that might be a mini fridge with freezer? Can’t tell for sure…

  • Reply Sue Kozin October 31, 2016 at 5:07 pm

    I would think that the dishwasher would be a great place to store dishes and pans. That said, no I do not like the unfinished look.

  • Reply JSB October 31, 2016 at 10:24 pm

    Dishwasher? That look like a mini fridge to me.

  • Reply Travis November 2, 2016 at 1:38 am

    You’d have to be in a moderate climate year round otherwise you’d freeze or have a heat stroke. This would seem incredibly inefficient to heat or cool.

  • Reply Barb Duder November 2, 2016 at 2:43 pm

    I also find the unfinished look unattractive and COLD. I’m in Iowa…we would freeze to death by November 15th 🙂

  • Reply gunguru01 November 17, 2016 at 7:29 am

    Can you say drafty!:-)

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