Bunk Box

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-1

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-2

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-3

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-4

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-5

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-6

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-7

bunk-box-portland-alternative-dwellings-8

The Bunk Box Tiny House from Shelter Wise is a unique tiny house that leaves the wall framing and electrical exposed on the interior. This stylish detail has a great benefit to the homeowner: rather than covering the framing with drywall or wood paneling, they can use – and feel – an extra seven inches of width stretch out all the way to the exterior sheathing. Space is precious in a tiny home, so why let conventional construction methods hide what you could be using?

Built on a 16 foot trailer, the Bunk Box is 125 square feet on the main floor, with an additional 72 square feet in the sleeping loft. Tall people rejoice! A flat roof and exposed roof framing mean extra head height in the loft. Two large skylights, six windows, and even a second, optional door open the house to sunlight, great views and fresh air.

Learn more about the design at PAD Tiny Houses.

A 16′, 125 square feet tiny house on wheels in Portland, Oregon. More info. here.

2016-10-28T09:21:00+00:00

13 Comments

  1. Amy October 28, 2016 at 9:31 am - Reply

    “This stylish detail has a great benefit to the homeowner: rather than covering the framing with drywall or wood paneling, they can use – and feel – an extra seven inches of width stretch out all the way to the exterior sheathing. Space is precious in a tiny home, so why let conventional construction methods hide what you could be using?”

    Because I’d like to not freeze my ass off? 😉

    • Kevin November 19, 2016 at 3:08 pm - Reply

      Amy what you are missing is that the design has 4″ thickness of foam on the outside of the framing and plywood shell, but yet concealed by the siding!

  2. Meeple Seerup October 28, 2016 at 1:01 pm - Reply

    I am the feerst commeent.

  3. Jason October 28, 2016 at 11:40 pm - Reply

    > so why let conventional construction methods hide what you could be using

    Um… Insulation?

  4. Sean Khang October 29, 2016 at 11:06 pm - Reply

    Hmm.. not a fan of unfinished looks…

  5. bklynebeth October 31, 2016 at 2:43 pm - Reply

    I am giggling hysterically…such a tiny house, such limited storage AND a dishwasher? Where would one store enough dishes to fill a dishwasher? I could see maybe a built-in washer/dryer all-in-one unit, but a dishwasher?

    • Amy November 1, 2016 at 2:29 am - Reply

      I think that might be a mini fridge with freezer?

    • Amy November 1, 2016 at 2:29 am - Reply

      I think that might be a mini fridge with freezer? Can’t tell for sure…

  6. Sue Kozin October 31, 2016 at 5:07 pm - Reply

    I would think that the dishwasher would be a great place to store dishes and pans. That said, no I do not like the unfinished look.

  7. JSB October 31, 2016 at 10:24 pm - Reply

    Dishwasher? That look like a mini fridge to me.

  8. Travis November 2, 2016 at 1:38 am - Reply

    You’d have to be in a moderate climate year round otherwise you’d freeze or have a heat stroke. This would seem incredibly inefficient to heat or cool.

  9. Barb Duder November 2, 2016 at 2:43 pm - Reply

    I also find the unfinished look unattractive and COLD. I’m in Iowa…we would freeze to death by November 15th 🙂

  10. gunguru01 November 17, 2016 at 7:29 am - Reply

    Can you say drafty!:-)

Leave A Comment