Albuquerque House

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22 comments

  • Jane says:

    I like this home but I don’t understand why there are platforms taking up space on the floor?

  • Annette says:

    Cool variation on standard floorpans, with the kitchen and bath being non-contiguous. Nice work, and good use of space. But what about an oven/stove? It appears there would be space enough in the open shelving for a 24″ -type unit.

    • Linda says:

      Anette, I think they can be used for storage and/or exra sleeping space for guests.A foam rubber mattress on the top and some bedding and you’re set to go !

  • Robert says:

    The platforms aren’t “taking up space”, they are masking the wheel wells and if I am not mistaken, there is a trundle bed or some kind of large storage drawer under the kitchen. VERY cool design.

    • Etienne says:

      Never knew there was a proper name for such a bed.

      Yes, the platform closest to the outside door acts partly to cover the wheel well, but IMO, I think it’s main purpose is to provide storage (I believe i can spot a few hinges, other than the ones in to floor of the kitchen), act as a step into the kitchen, and provide a sense of separation between the entrance and living area. The wheel well on the other side only looks to jet out a few inches. The storage part is likely very important, as i don’t see a whole lot of it otherwise. Maybe a closet of some sort? Which would be pretty cool…

  • Mike Wofsey says:

    I like the design. One note … they put the air conditioner high up in the loft, which is a good, since the AC is a small heat pump, and it works most efficiently when it has access to the most heat, which is the highest place in the house’s volume. Properly locating an AC like this can save a surprising amount of power and allow for a smaller unit which takes up less space. Good job in so many ways with this design.

  • Esther says:

    Nice! Great to see another one of these in Abq. Good call on the SIPs. I really think they’re the only way to go

  • Mike says:

    Lots of good ideas here.

    • Brian says:

      The idea is sound, but I wouldn’t want the AC blowing over me while in bed. I like the house, though…very nice. I’m not sure about the 3 level deck. I could get used to it in a pinch. 🙂

      • SC says:

        “I wouldn’t want the AC blowing over me while in bed.”
        Yes, that is a good way to get pneumonia.
        The exterior is soooo pretty and nicely done! The inside is cute too. I am torn on the trundle. It a great way to deal with a bed. Its just I personally dont like moving or transforming stuff I use every single day, even though most tiny houses are just about that.

  • Renee says:

    I’d love to know where in ABQ these are for a couple of reasons. #1 Is this setup in someone’s backyard or is it on a lot by itself? #2 If it’s on a lot, how are the owners able to get around city zoning/building issues. #3 I didn’t see a commode in the pictures. Does it have one? #4 Is it possible to see this in person or any other tiny house in ABQ for that matter.

  • D says:

    The lower platform looks like it has 5 dresser drawers across it, and the kitchen has a pull out bed and large storage box

  • Fredo says:

    Nice Prison Shower. Very inviting. Brings back memories…

  • Dorothy says:

    AC or fans blowing on you don’t cause pneumonia unless, of course, the unit is contaminated with mold. That can make you very sick and it doesn’t need to be nearby or directly on you to be asleep. However I wouldn’t want the sound of the AC that close to my head while I try to sleep. Unless it was very hot outside maybe cooling down the house before going to bed might be enough to be comfortable for the night.

    The web site explains that there is a full sized bed for guests under the kitchen platform. The changing would be a pain but wouldn’t need to happen often unless you had lots of guests. I wish they’d shown it with the bed out.

  • Gigi Marsten says:

    Wouldn’t it be better to have the option of a hand-held showerhead in such a small space? I think so.

  • Excellent basic design. Many Many people prefere the tuck under first floor bed with storage up some ladder. many of us can not do a ladder, thus the tuck under bed is a welcome design. This build is very creative and attractive. actually very livable for one person. I have no interest in a standard stove with 4 buners and an oven. I have found in practice that a single induction burner, plus a countertop convection oven, plys a microwave is adequate for almost all cooking. I am a real cook from scratch. I do not just heat up leftovers from the last dinner i bought outside. the other consideration is whether the burners will be electric or gas. this design leaves the choice to the purchaser.

  • I forgot to mention that a split system for heat and A/C is superior to a window unit in function and energy consumption. Again choices depend on the diversity of climates and the persons tolerance for either cold or heat.

  • Tori says:

    Lovely design. I must agree the fridge is unnecessarily huge considering there is no stove; although the bottom shelves to the right of the kitchen could easily store a large toaster oven or microwave full-time. Most likely its purpose since there’s not too much counter space for one

  • Travis says:

    Since your home is mobile, I curious to know that the weight is if it’s on a two axle trailer. I am currently building a 150 ft. home on a two axle (10K lb. capacity) trailer which seems to be similar to yours in design. My intent is to modify the plans I have to extend the dormer the full length of the house. My concern is that I don’t want to exceed the trailer capacity with my “lofty” design modifications. Thanks for any feedback you’re willing to offer.

  • Travis says:

    Since your home is mobile, I am curious to know what its weight is if it’s on a two axle trailer. I am currently building a 150 ft. home on a two axle (10K lb. capacity) trailer which seems to be similar to yours in design. My intent is to modify the plans I have to extend the dormer the full length of the house. My concern is that I don’t want to exceed the trailer capacity with my “lofty” design modifications. Thanks for any feedback you’re willing to offer.

    BTW, the designs I am using are the Cypress (Horizon 20) from Tumbleweed.

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