30′ Off Grid Tiny House

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A 240 square feet tiny house built by Upper Valley Tiny Homes in Utah. More info. here.

6 comments

  • SusanB says:

    Where on earth do you sit?! There is nowhere to put an easy chair, much less a loveseat. All that space and nowhere to relax except bed …

    • Patrick says:

      The placement of the tables and doors does make furniture a bit awkward, but I can see it looking quite cozy with an upholstered chair and ottoman with storage. The smaller loft could make quite a comfortable nook, too.. But I personally like sitting near the stove!

  • Drew says:

    I find tiny homes charming but I often wonder why rv and marine designs aren’t used as guidelines at times. While I understand that the building quality of a tiny home is often vastly different than travel trailers, I wonder why I’m able to purchase a 31′ travel trailer which includes a comfortable living area with a sofa bed, a dinette with seating for 4, a spacious kitchen prep area with 3 burner stove/oven and medium-sized fridge, a small bathroom with a comfortably-sized shower, plus a bedroom with a queen-size bed. Forgot to mention that it has lots of storage space as well and that all of these spaces are on ONE level. When you take all of these features and compare them to the average tiny home, the floor plans of most rvs are, in my humble opinion, far more efficiently designed.

    • Steph says:

      The complete customization and appearance/feel of a house, vs a camper. I look at the 5th wheels in the same price range I will be spending on my THOW and the finishes are ugly and fabrics that I wouldn’t put on a dog bed.

      Perhaps it’s also the ability to be off grid/solar powered, at least for me.

      One man’s off the shelf trailer is another woman’s nightmare.

  • Kathy says:

    Glad I looked at the walk-through. Client’s an artist, so that’s why the tables and storage closet where I would have a comfy sofa (also an artist, but I work tiny myself!). Like the cheer of all the light, would make different choices re sink size and such, but nice job altogether. The child-safety locks for keeping cabinet doors in place while moving are a great idea.

    Once again, BANISTERS and SAFETY RAILINGS are more helpful than youngs realize — one bad step at night down from your fab loft bed and you’re literally grounded.

  • Di says:

    Nice place that matches what the owner wanted, which makes it perfect. So I’m just nit-picking here. The placement of the air conditioner doesn’t work for me. I wouldn’t want to work or sit directly in front for any length of time. Cold air falls, so to me it makes sense to place the unit high. Make it accessible in case the remote is lost (a huge problem at my house) or if the batteries die. Based on the number of windows and their placement, I don’t see where else it could have gone. Kathy covered the safety railing comment that I want to leave on every THOW that doesn’t have them. A fall from that height can do serious or permanentdamage, no matter what age you are.

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